Legal Recognition of Laetrile

There has been some progress in Australia since the mid-1970s ban, yet information about Laetrile’s benefits has not been getting through to the general public, let alone to most medical practitioners who treat cancer.

If you wish to obtain a legal permit to obtain and use Laetrile in Australia, you must proceed with caution as the regulations and permits contain ambiguous language used to protect the departments involved.

It is possible to obtain Laetrile/B17/amygdalin in Australia legally, whether from local or foreign sources, by applying to the Therapeutic Goods Special Access Scheme in Canberra.

(Download “Category A Form Special Access Scheme” from http://www.tga.gov.au/docs/pdf/unapproved/sascata.pdf, complete it with your medical practitioner and fax it to 1021 6232 8112. Check http://www.tga.gov.au for additional details.)

 

However, at least in Queensland, having a TGA import permit for Laetrile does not allow you or your doctor to possess or use it: the legislation stipulates that you must obtain specific approval from Queensland Health.

 

Back in 2003, Queensland Health confirmed that it had issued a small number of approvals to doctors to treat their patients with amygdalin/B17/Laetrile under strict guidelines. This was one step in the right direction.

However, in 2006 it tightened the regulations, deciding not to issue approval for treatment with oral amygdalin but only for intravenous or intramuscular treatment (see Queensland Health, Circular No. 01/2006).

 

Patients to be treated with amygdalin have to be informed of the following (and agree to it in writing): that the process by which the amygdalin is manufactured may not be subject to quality control; that there is potential cyanide toxicity associated with amygdalin; and that there is a lack of scientific evidence relating to the efficacy of amygdalin.

As we have seen, the second and third of these issues have been repeatedly addressed by respected members of the scientific/medical community. One reason given in the 2006 Queensland Health circular to warrant all of this over-stringent control: a possible side effect of a high temperature!

It’s two steps forward, one step back!

 

In Queensland, the patient must obtain a form, titled “Drugs and Poisons: Application for Approval to Obtain, Possess and Use Amygdalin – Informed Consent”, from Queensland Health (see http://www.health.qld.gov.au).

The patient must then complete the form and sign it with their oncologist, who must then fill out and submit a form titled “Application by a Medical Practitioner for Approval to Obtain, Possess and Use Amygdalin”.

Check the website for further guidelines.

 

If you are not in Australia, strive to make yourself aware of the legislation surrounding the use of amygdalin/B17/ Laetrile in your own country. You may be surprised. I believe that it is legal to use amygdalin in the treatment of cancer in Mexico, Canada and some European countries.

I also understand that the traditional practice of using the stone fruit kernels has never stopped in many Asian countries and has remained the standard form of first-line anti-cancer therapy. I would be very interested if any readers could send me the current legislation from their respective countries.

 

To take this forward, we need to organise and sign petitions and email government health departments and authorities, demanding our right to self-determination on access to Laetrile, in all its forms, given the many studies confirming its safety and effectiveness.

Remember, no matter what law any authority makes, your health is your responsibility. You have the right to make informed choices in matters concerning your body and your health. The authorities exert Draconian control over our health freedoms, and we must let them know that we are very unhappy with this situation.

 

If enough people demand that amygdalin/B17/Laetrile be more freely available, the more likely that the onerous, ridiculous restrictions will be lifted on the use of Laetrile.

The powers-that-be will finally have to loosen their stranglehold on “the cancer industry”.